I’ve been doing this one for a long time and someone asked about it on the discussion groups recently. I figured I would link them to my blog showing them how to do it and I realized I’ve never written this one up.

So, here’s the problem, Civil 3D does not have dynamic labels for assemblies. There are labels for just about everything but not for assemblies.What do you do?

Well, it’s pretty simple, just add a piece of text adjacent to the assembly and then add a field to the text. To insert a field, you can click the button on the ribbon (as you are editing the text) or press ctrl+f.

Add a field to text

Add a field to text

In the field dialog box, you’ll want to change the category to “Objects”, choose “Object” from the list, and then select the object.

Choose an Object

Choose an Object

Once you’ve selected the assembly (the vertical line, not one of the subassemblies), you’ll want to choose “Name” from the list (not “Object Name” or you’ll get “AeccDbAssembly” in the text). You can also format the case of the text in the right hand window.

Adding the Name

Adding the Name

Once you are done, you’ll see the field in the text with the assemblies name. If you change the name of the assembly, the field will update when the drawing is regen’d (it’s not immediate like Civil 3D labels).

Label Added

Label Added

You can also copy the text, edit the field, and have it reference a different assembly. And, another cool thing, if you copy the assembly and the text together, the new text will reference the new assembly.

 

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It’s just been announced that the Subassembly Composer that has been available at Autodesk Labs is now an official add on to Autodesk Civil 3D 2011 and 2012. If your Civil 3D is on subscription, log into the subscription website and go get it (well, on or after July 7, 2011 that is). I was given a bit of a sneak preview of this by Dana Probert, Peter Funk, and Dave Simeone and I  got to admit, it looks really cool! I’ve always told my clients that 98% or more of any type of assembly they needed to create could be done with the out of the box subassemblies and the rest could be done if they knew how to program in .net. Well, this tool just opened up all that custom subassembly creation to the masses of people that don’t know .net (including myself).

You can add the basic building blocks of any subassembly; points, links, and shapes using this tool. However, the real power of this tool comes from the additional options, primarily the Decision and Switch tools. These are basically your IF THEN statements within the subassembly. If I’m in fill, do this, if that link is shorter than that other link, do that.

And then you have the Auxiliary tools. Place a test point here and get the intersection of a link from a specific slope from that auxiliary point. Is the elevation of that auxiliary point lower than the end of that link?

The possibilities of this tool are mindboggling to say the least. Want more information? Check out Dana’s video HERE or Cyndi’s blog post HERE, or even those folks over there at Civil4d.com HERE (Matt Kolberg to be specific).

This is some pretty exciting stuff so look for more information around the web or possibly even here.