July 2011


Last week, one of our tech support geniuses (thanks Deni) solved a problem for me. I wanted to be able to reset the classroom computers back to a factory install for Civil 3D 2011 and 2012. Well, it turns out to be simpler than I thought it would be. All you have to do is delete a folder in Windows Explorer and delete a folder out of your registry.

IF YOU MESS WITH YOUR REGISTRY AND IT BLOWS UP DON’T BLAME ME BECAUSE RIGHT NOW I’M TELLING YOU TO MAKE A BACKUP OF YOUR REGISTRY BEFORE YOU DO ANYTHING LIKE THIS AND YOU SHOULD NEVER TRUST SOMEONE ON THE INTERNET TELLING YOU TO MODIFY YOUR REGISTRY WITHOUT TAKING THE APPROPRIATE PRECAUTIONS LIKE BACKING UP YOUR REGISTRY!

Now that I have that out of the way, simply do this. Go into Windows Explorer and delete the folder the corresponds to the version of Civil 3D you want to reset (this works for other verticals as well as regular AutoCAD as well but make sure you get the right stuff for those other programs) from “C:\Users\<username>\AppData\Roaming\Autodesk” (replace <username> with your login name on your computer). In this case, since I’m trying to reset Civil 3D 2011 and Civil 3D 2012, I’ll delete those two folder. NOTE: This location is for Windows 7. I’m not sure what the path is for other operating systems but since you are running C3D, you are running Windows 7, right? If not, you should be.

Now, you just need to make a slight modification to your registry (see my disclaimer above). Hit your Windows Key on your keyboard and type “regedit” and hit enter. This will bring up your registry editor. Now simply browse down through it till you find “HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Autodesk\AutoCAD\” This is where all your AutoCAD based Autodesk software is stored (at least the part of it we are concerned with). The versions I wanted to reset were 2011 and 2012 so, 2011 is found in the R18.1 folder and 2012 is found in the R18.2 folder. Now, for Civil 3D 2011, delete the R18.1\ACAD-9000:409 key and for 2012, delete R18.2\ACAD-A000:409.

Once you are done with that, simply restart C3D and the Secondary Installer will run and you will get a nice freshly installed C3D on your system.

If you are leary about editing your registry, check out http://seilercadsupport.wordpress.com/2011/07/30/i-want-a-do-over/ for instructions on resetting C3D without the registry edits. (I have to give credit where credit is due, that post from the Seiler CAD Support Blog was the inspiration for this post.)

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CAD-1 has been selling a library of parts for the pipe networks that assist in modeling waterlines, sewerlines, as well as some local storm sewer parts. I’ve had several people call asking for assistance on how to use these parts so I decided to create a series of videos that should help with that. Now, if you aren’t using our part library, there is still a lot of good information in these videos for anyone that is using the pipe networks for modeling your waterlines.

If you are interested in purchasing the library, please see our website at http://civil3dpartbuilder.com

If you would like to see the entire video, please click HERE

I’ve broken the video up into the different parts and have included them all here for your enjoyment.

Part1 – Introduction

Part2 – Drawing Settings

Part3 – Creating Styles

Part4 – Rule Sets

Part5 – Parts Lists

Part6 – Creating the Network

Part7 – Adding Additional Pipes

It’s just been announced that the Subassembly Composer that has been available at Autodesk Labs is now an official add on to Autodesk Civil 3D 2011 and 2012. If your Civil 3D is on subscription, log into the subscription website and go get it (well, on or after July 7, 2011 that is). I was given a bit of a sneak preview of this by Dana Probert, Peter Funk, and Dave Simeone and I  got to admit, it looks really cool! I’ve always told my clients that 98% or more of any type of assembly they needed to create could be done with the out of the box subassemblies and the rest could be done if they knew how to program in .net. Well, this tool just opened up all that custom subassembly creation to the masses of people that don’t know .net (including myself).

You can add the basic building blocks of any subassembly; points, links, and shapes using this tool. However, the real power of this tool comes from the additional options, primarily the Decision and Switch tools. These are basically your IF THEN statements within the subassembly. If I’m in fill, do this, if that link is shorter than that other link, do that.

And then you have the Auxiliary tools. Place a test point here and get the intersection of a link from a specific slope from that auxiliary point. Is the elevation of that auxiliary point lower than the end of that link?

The possibilities of this tool are mindboggling to say the least. Want more information? Check out Dana’s video HERE or Cyndi’s blog post HERE, or even those folks over there at Civil4d.com HERE (Matt Kolberg to be specific).

This is some pretty exciting stuff so look for more information around the web or possibly even here.